FAQs: Additional Travel

 

Q: Are we allowed to travel to Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, México?

A: NEH is not responsible for incidents that may occur if you choose to cross into México.

There are no travel restrictions into Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, México. However, parts of the city remain dangerous for residents and travelers.

If you wish to travel into México be aware that a U.S. Passport or Passport Card is required.

 

Q: What does the U.S. Department of State advise about travel in Mexico?

A:  Please review the following travel warning that was last updated on November 15, 2018.

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain parts of México due to the activities of criminal organizations in those areas. U.S. citizens have been the victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery in various Mexican states.

Ciudad Juárez: Exercise caution in all areas. U.S. government personnel are prohibited from traveling after dark west of Eje. Juan Gabriel and south of Boulevard Zaragoza. Defer non-essential travel to the areas southeast of Boulevard Independencia and the Valle de Juárez region.

Chihuahua City: U.S. government employees must travel from Ciudad Juárez to Chihuahua City during daylight hours via Highway 45, stopping only at the shops at Highway 45/Miguel Ahumada in the town of Villa Ahumada. They may not travel to the Morelos, Villa, and Zapata districts of Chihuahua.

Nuevo Casas Grandes Area (including Nuevo Casas Grandes, Casas Grades, Mata Ortíz, Colonia Juarez, Colonia LeBaron, and Paquime): U.S. government employees must travel to the Nuevo Casas Grandes area during daylight hours through the United States. U.S. government employees should enter Mexico at the Palomas Port of Entry on New Mexico Route 11 before connecting to Mexico Highway 2 to Nuevo Casas Grandes.

The U.S. Department of State warns U.S. citizens about the risk of traveling to certain parts of México due to the activities of criminal organizations in those areas. U.S. citizens have been the victims of violent crimes, including homicide, kidnapping, carjacking, and robbery in various Mexican states.